Transducer Installation Instructions

Survey Echosounder Transducers

IMPORTANT: Please read the instructions completely before proceeding with the installation.

Select your installation type:

Over the Side Installation Instructions

Portable Survey Transducers P01540, P02560, P02565

IMPORTANT: Please read the instructions completely before proceeding with the installations.
NOTE: Use these only as a guide. It is the responsibilty of the end user to select the correct installation type for your vessel.
WARNING: NEVER US SOLVENTS! Certain cleaners, gasoline, paint, sealants and other products may contain strong solvents, such as acetone, which can attack many plastics dramatically reducing their strength. Clean surface of transducer with a mild detergent only.

Note: If the transducer will be installed through the hull, mount it in a fiberglass or wood hull only.
We do not recommend mounting a bronze housing in a metal hull because electrolytic corrosion will occur.

Tools and Materials Needed

  • Silicone grease or petroleum jelly (Vaseline ®)
  • Pipe coupling
  • Pipe with threads to match the pipe coupling
  • Pipe coupling adapter:
  • P01540-  1/2" - 14NPS threads
  • P02560-  3/4" - 14NPS threads
  • P02565-     1" - 14NPS threads
  • Support Lines or cables
  • Clamps
  • Mild Household Detergent (i.e.,dishwashing liquid)

Mounting Location

The transducer must be fully immersed in water and not subjected to air bubbles or turbulent water flowing across the radiating face.

Acoustic Noise

Acoustic noise is always present and these sound waves can interfere with the operation of the transducer. While background noise cannot be controlled, carefully selecting the transducer mounting location can minimize the effect of vessel generated noise. The lower the noise level, the higher the echosounder gain setting that can be used.

· Background noise sources:

  • Waves and air bubbles
  • Fish and mammals
  • Rain and hail
  • Other vessels and shore

· Vessel generated noise sources;

  • Propeller(s)
  • Propeller shaft vibration
  • Aerated and turbulent water flowing across the hull
  • Machinery such as: engine, generator. gears and pumps
  • Interference from other echosounders

Caution: Do not Mount the sensor in an area of turbulence or bubbles:

  • Near water intake or discharge openings.
  • Behind strakes, fittings or hull irregularities.
  • Near the keel
  • Behind eroding paint (an indication of turbulence)

Installation

Caution: Never pull, carry or hold the transducer by the cable as this may sever internal connections.

1. Apply silicone grease or petroleum jelly to the threads of the pipe to facilitate disassembly.

2. Twist the pipe coupling onto the pipe.

3. Push the transducer cable through the pipe.

Alternately after the transducer is attached, clamp the cable to the outside of the pipe using cable clamps.

4. Apply silicone grease or petroleum jelly to the transducer stem. Thread the transducer stem into the pipe coupling. Careful do not smear the transducer face.

Alternately, the transducer can be mounted to an adapter plate or fairing. Then the plate or fairing is bolted or clamped to the pipe.

5.Attach a line(s) or cable(s) to the pipe near the transducer that will support the pipe from the force of the water when the boat is underway.

6.Clamp the pipe to the gunnel.

7.Fasten the line(s) or cable(s) fore and aft with sufficient tension to support the pipe when the boat is underway.

8.Route the cable to the instrument being careful not to tear the cable jacket. To reduce electrical interference, separate the transducer cable from other electrical wiring. Coil any excess cable and secure it in place with zip-ties to prevent damage.

9.Wire the transducer to the Echosounder per diagram

Antifouling Paint:

Surface exposed to salt water must be coated with antifouling paint.

Use water-based antifouling paint only. Never use ketone-based paints as it can attack many plastics damagin the transducer.

Maintenance and Repair

Aquatic growth can accumulate rapidly on the transducer's surface reducing its performance in weeks. Clean the surface, keeping it free of marine growth and petrolem residue, with a soft cloth and mild household detergent.

Inspect the cable periodically for kinks, abrasions and cuts. Repair any damage using an approved waterproofing cable repair system. Inspect connections for indications of corrosion.

In-Hull Mount

(Fiberglass only)

IMPORTANT: Please read the instructions completely before proceeding with the installation.
NOTE: Use these only as a guide. It is the responsibility of the end user to select the correct installation type for your vessel and transducer type.
WARNING: NEVER USE SOLVENTS! Certain cleaners, gasoline, paint, sealants and other products may contain strong solvents, such as acetone, which can attack many plastics dramatically reducing their strength. Clean surface of transducer with a mild detergent only.

Mounting Location

The transducer must be fully immersed in water and not subjected to air bubbles flowing across the radiating face.

Acoustic Noise

Acoustic noise is always present and these sound waves can interfere with the operation of the transducer. While background noise cannot be controlled, carefully selecting the transducer mounting location can minimize the effect of vessel generated noise. The lower the noise level, the higher the echo-sounder gain setting that can be used.

· Background noise sources:

  • Waves and air bubbles
  • Fish and mammals
  • Rain and hail
  • Other vessels and shore

· Vessel generated noise sources;

  • Propeller(s)
  • Propeller shaft vibration
  • Aerated and turbulent water flowing across the hull
  • Machinery such as: engine, generator. gears and pumps
  • Interference from other echo-sounders

On Displacement Hulls:

Carefully study the shape of the hull to determine the best transducer mounting location where;

  • The transducer is away from the propeller and other sources of vessel generated noise.
  • The water is smoothest with a minimum of turbulence and bubbles.

1. Locate the transducer about 1/3 aft LWL. Generally, this provides the best compromise between obtaining aeration-free water away from the bow and minimizing propeller noise.

 

 

2. Water near the keel can be quite aerated. Mounting it away from the keel can minimize interference with the transducer. Also, the deeper the transducer protrudes into the water, the less aeration.

3. Mount the transducer on the side of the hull where the propeller is moving downward. The upward motion of the propeller generates pressure waves and pushes bubbles up against the hull. By mounting on the downward side, the hull shades the transducer from this effect.

Caution: Do not mount the sensor in an area of turbulence or bubbles:

  • Near water intake or discharge openings.
  • Behind strakes, fittings or hull irregularities.
  • Near the keel
  • Behind eroding paint (an indication of turbulence)

Installation

In-Hull Mount (Fiberglass hull only)

1 - Position the transducer at the selected location and test it with the echo-sounder before proceeding. There are two test methods.

  •  Lay the transducer against the hull and flood the area to cover the acoustic window.
  •  Grind the interior test surface smooth and wet it generously Put the transducer in a plastic bag and fill it with water. Place the bag containing the transducer on the test surface.

2. Construct a water box with a removable lid using the hull as the bottom. Design the box so that the lid is parallel to the waterline.

3. At the selected location grind the inside hull surface smooth and fiberglass the box in place.

 

 

 

4. Mark the location of the two threaded rod holes (used to mount the transducer) on the lid. Locate the cable exit hole about half way between the threaded rod. Locate a fill hole between the transducer and the wall of the box. Drill two 10mm (13/32") diameter holes for the threaded rods and the remaining two holes.

5. Following the manufacturer's directions apply a 3mm (1/8") thick layer of marine sealant to the perimeter of the transducer that makes contact with the lid.

6. Attach the transducer to the underside of the removable lid. Thread the cable through the center hole. Apply marine sealant to each threaded rod end. Secure each rod with a nut. The rods should extend a minimum of 3 threads beyond the nut. Slide a stainless steel washer and rubber washer onto each rod. Push the threaded rods through the transducer and lid. Apply marine sealant to the rod near the lid. Secure the assembly in place with a stainless steel washer and nut. Tighten the nuts with a torque wrench using a force not exceeding 4 N-m (3 ft-lb).

7. Apply marine sealant to the space around the cable and the lip of the box. Fasten the lid to the box ensuring there is a watertight seal,

8. Fill the box with distilled water, or in cold climates use polypropylene glycol or mineral oil. Plug the fill hole.

9.Wire the transducer to the Echosounder per diagram:

Checking for Leaks:

Warning: Never install a transducer and leave the boat in the water unchecked for several days.

When the boat is placed in the water, immediately check around the bolts that fasten the transducer to the hull and the stuffing tube for leaks. Note that very small leaks may not be readily observed. It is best not to leave the boat in the water unattended for more than 3 hours before checking it again. If there is a small leak, there may be considerable bilge water accumulation after 24 hours (probably not enough to cause water damage). If a leak is observed, repeat the bedding and installation procedures immediately.

Antifouling Paint:

Surfaces exposed to salt water must be coated with antifouling paint.

Use water-based antifouling paint only. Never use ketone-based paints as it can attack many plastics damaging the transducer. Apply antifouling paint every six months, or at the beginning of each boating season.

Maintenance and Repair

Aquatic growth can accumulate rapidly on the transducer's surface reducing its performance in weeks. Clean the surface with a soft cloth and mild household detergent. If necessary, use a stiff brush or putty knife to remove the growth taking care to avoid making scratches. if fouling is severe , wet sand with #220 or finer grade wet/dry sandpaper.

Inspect the cable periodically for kinks, abrasions and cuts. Repair any damage using an approved waterproofing cable repair system. Inspect connections for indications of corrosion.

Outer-Hull Mount

IMPORTANT: Please read the instructions completely before proceeding with the installation.
NOTE: Use these only as a guide. It is the responsibility of the end user to select the correct installation type for your vessel and stransducer type.

WARNING: NEVER USE SOLVENTS! Certain cleaners, gasoline, paint, sealants and other products may contain strong solvents, such as acetone, which can attack many plastics dramatically reducing their strength. Clean surface of transducer with a mild detergent only.

Mounting Location

The transducer must be fully immersed in water and not subjected to air bubbles, or turbulent water flowing across the radiating face.

Acoustic Noise

Acoustic noise is always present and these sound waves can interfere with the operation of the transducer. While background noise cannot be controlled, carefully selecting the transducer mounting location can minimize the effect of vessel generated noise. The lower the noise level, the higher the echo-sounder gain setting that can be used.

Background noise sources:

  • Waves and air bubbles
  • Fish and mammals
  • Rain and hail
  • Other vessels and shore

Vessel generated noise sources:

  • Propeller(s)
  • Propeller shaft vibration
  • Aerated and turbulent water flowing across the hull
  • Machinery such as: engine, generator. gears and pumps
  • Interference from other echo-sounders

 

On Displacement Hulls:

Carefully study the shape of the hull to determine the best transducer mounting location where:

  • The transducer is away from the propeller and other sources of vessel generated noise
  • The water is smoothest with a minimum of turbulence and bubbles

1. Locate the transducer about 1/3 aft LWL. Generally, this provides the best compromises between obtaining aeration-free water away from the bow and minimizing propeller noise.

 

 

 

2. Water near the keel can be quite aerated. Mounting it away from the keel can minimize interference with the transducer. Also, the deeper the transducer protrudes into the water, the less aeration.

3. Mount the transducer on the side of the hull where the propeller is moving downward. The upward motion of the propeller generates pressure waves and pushes bubbles up against the hull. By mounting on the downward side, the hull shades the transducer from this effect.

Caution: Do not mount the sensor in an area of turbulence or bubbles:

  • Near water intake or discharge openings.
  • Behind strakes, fittings or hull irregularities.
  • Near the keel
  • Behind eroding paint (an indication of turbulence)

 

Fairing and Backing Block:

A fairing provides a level-mounting surface. Nearly all vessels have some deadrise angle at the transducer's mounting location. If the transducer is mounted directly to the hull, the sound beam would be tilted off the vertical at the same angle as the deadrise. If the deadrise angle at the mounting location exceeds 10o fairing is strongly recommended (see above figures).

Fairing
  • Vertically orients the sound beam by mounting the transducer parallel to the water.
  • Inclines the transducer so the acoustic window is shaded from propeller noise. Generally a 3° incline angle is recommended.
  • Minimizes aerated water flowing over the transducer's face by mounting it deeper in the water.
  • Reduces drag by directing the water around the transducer.
 Backing Block

A backing block is mounted inside the hull to provide a level surface for tightening the threaded rods that hold the transducer in place. It is fabricated with the interior deadrise angle (see Figures 3 and 5). After cutting  the fairing the remaining section can be used as the backing block (see Figure 4).

Cutting the Fairing:

1. Measure the deadrise angle of the hull at the selected location using a digital level, or bubble level and protractor.

2. Tilt the band saw table to the measured angle and secure the cutting fence.

Caution: Be sure to orient the fairing on the band saw so the angle cut matches the intended side of the hull and not the mirror image.

3. Place the fairing on the table so the cutting guide (if any) rests against the fence and the arrow will be pointing forward toward the bow when the fairing is installed.

Note: The blunt end always points forward toward the bow.

Warning: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.

4. Recheck steps 1 through 3, then cut the fairing.

5. Shape the fairing to the hull as precisely as possible with a rasp or power tool.

Stuffing Tube Recommendations:

Installation of the transducer requires a stuffing tube. Stuffing tubes are typically of two types; a threaded stem design which passes through the hull and is secured with a large nut and marine sealant, and tubes which are welded to the hull. Additionally, stuffing tubes must be compatible with the hull material.

Special care must be taken to insure these tubes will form a tight seal with the cable of your transducer. A stuffing tube for an aluminum hull must be fabricated from an aluminum alloy, electrolytically compatible with the hull plate.

Threaded Stem Stuffing Tube Installation

Threaded Rod Placement Dimensions


 

Installation

Preparing the Installation Site:

1. Position the  fairing at the selected location being sure that the blunt end points forward toward the bow.  The distance between the two threaded rod holes for this sytle transducer equals 305mm (12.0").

The stuffing tube is located about half way between the threaded rods. Inspect the hull interior to ensure that there is clearance for the stuffing tube and that no cables, ribs or struts will interfere. Mark the site for the threaded rods and stuffing tube.

Warning: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.

2. From inside the hull, drill a 3mm (1/8") diameter pilot hole for the stuffing tube. However, if there is a hull irregularity near the selected mounting location, drill from the outside. If the pilot hole is drilled in the wrong location, drill a second hole in a better location. In a fiberglass hull apply masking tape on the outside of the hull over the incorrect hole and fill it with epoxy. For wooden hulls fill the incorrect hole with marine sealant; in metal weld the hole closed.

3. At the pilot hole, drill a 28mm (1-1/8") diameter hole (for a 1" tube) from the outside perpendicular to the hull surface for the stuffing tube. Remove all burrs and clean the area around the hole, inside and outside, to ensure that the marine sealant will adhere properly. A backing block may be required under the flanged nut to ensure that it can be tightened against a flat surface.

4. Drill two l0mm (1-3/32") diameter holes through the hull and backing block for the threaded rods. Care must be taken to ensure that the two rods are parallel to the keel to reduce drag.

5. Install the stuffing tube first. Remove the nuts, washers and bushing from the stuffing tube. Select a marine grade sealant and follow the directions for its use. Apply a 3mm (1/8") thick layer of marine sealant to the stuffing tube from the flange that makes contact with the outside of the hull to where the flanged nut will be tightened inside the hull. This will seal the hull and hold the nut securely in place.

Push the stem of the stuffing tube through the hull and fasten the flanged nut inside. On a fiberglass or metal hull, tighten this nut securely. On an aluminum hull use the spacers to isolate the stuffing tube from the hull, being sure to apply marine sealant to the spacers as well. If the hull is wood and has been out of the water for a prolonged period, it is suggested that the flanged nut be hand tightened only. Wood will swell after the boat is in the water and exert considerable pressure on the stuffing tube hardware. After the hull has expanded, tighten the nut securely.

Using a Steel Stuffing Tube

Airmar steel stuffing tubes can be installed with or without welded conduit. Some approval authorities require that the transducer cable be encased in conduit. In such an installation, the conduit is welded to the steel stuffing tube. In welded conduit installations the stuffing tube must have the compression nut tightened from outside the hull. Airmar stuffing tubes are reversible allowing the compression nut to be tightened from outside or inside the hull.

1. Position the Airmar fairing at the selected location being sure that the blunt end points toward the bow. (the transducer used for this example is symmetrical.) The distance between the two threaded rod holes equals 305mm (12.0").

The stuffing tube is located about half way between the threaded rods. Inspect the hull interior to ensure that there is clearance for the stuffing tube and that no cables, ribs or struts will interfere. Mark the site for the threaded rods and stuffing tube on the outside of the hull.

Warning: A fire watch must be stationed inside the hull.

2. Drill or cut (with a cutting torch) a 38mm (1-112") diameter hole (for this example) in the hull for installation of the stuffing tube. Grind the area around the hole, inside and outside, removing all burrs.

3. Drill two l0mm (13/32') diameter holes (for this example) through the hull and backing block for the threaded rods. Care must be taken to ensure that the two rods are parallel to the keel to reduce drag.

4. Install the stuffing tube first. Remove the compression nut, washers and compression bushing from the stuffing tube. Insert the tube into the hull and weld it in place.


 

Installing the Transducer

Exterior Mount

1. Screw a nut and slide a washer onto each threaded rod. Position the nuts 86mm (3.38") from the rod ends. Following the sealant manufacturer's directions, apply marine sealant to the threaded rods where the nut will seat against the fairing. Slide the threaded rods through the fairing. The rods will extend above and below the fairing.

2. Apply a 3mm (1/8') thick layer of marine sealant to the surface of the fairing that will make contact with the hull and the two threaded rods that will pass through the hull. Place the fairing against the hull, pushing the rods through the hull. With a person stationed inside the vessel position the backing blocks on the rods and secure them with a stainless steel washer and nut. Tighten the nuts with a torque wrench using a force not exceeding 7 N-m (5 ft-lb). Remove excess sealant.

Note: If a wood fairing is used, hand tighten the nuts only Allow the fairing to swell and then tighten to 4N-m (3ft-1b).

Caution: Never pull, carry or hold the transducer by its cable as this may sever internal connections.

3. Thread the transducer cable through the stuffing tube to the inside of the hull. Allow a service loop in the cavity of the fairing so there is no tension applied to the cable.

4. Mount the transducer to the fairing by sliding a rubber washer and stainless steel washer onto each threaded rod and securing it with a nut.Tighten the nuts with a torque wrench using a force not exceeding 4 N-m (3 ft-lb).The rods should extend a minimum of 3 threads beyond the nut when tightened. Apply marine sealant to the exposed threads.

5. Plug the mounting holes to minimize turbulence on the surface of the transducer using the white, foam, plug material. Cut the foam to length so that, when installed, each plug is recessed 5mm (3/16") below the surface of the housing. Push these foam plugs into the holes and use marine sealant to fill the holes even with the transducers surface. Remove excess sealant to ensure smooth water flow over the transducer.

6. Seal the cable by sliding the washer, rubber compression bushing, washer, and the compression nut down the transducer cable to the stuffing tube. Make sure the rubber bushing fits securely into the machined lip of the tube. Tighten the compression nut. Remove all excess sealant inside the hull.

7. Route the cable to the echo-sounder being careful not to tear the cable jacket when passing it through the bulkhead and other parts of the boat. To reduce electrical interference separate the transducer cable from other electrical wiring and the engine. Coil any excess cable and secure it in place with zip-ties to prevent damage.

8.Wire the transducer to the Echosounder per diagram Bathy-500MF or Bathy-1500.


 

Checking for Leaks:

Warning: Never install a transducer and leave the boat in the water unchecked for several days.

When the boat is placed in the water, immediately check around the bolts that fasten the transducer to the hull and the stuffing tube for leaks. Note that very small leaks may not be readily observed. It is best not to leave the boat in the water unattended for more than 3 hours before checking it again. If there is a small leak, there may be considerable bilge water accumulation after 24 hours (probably not enough to cause water damage). If a leak is observed, repeat the bedding and installation procedures immediately.


 

Antifouling Paint:

Surfaces exposed to salt water must be coated with antifouling paint.

Use water-based antifouling paint only. Never use ketone-based paints as it can attack many plastics damaging the transducer. Apply antifouling paint every six months, or at the beginning of each boating season.

Maintenance and Repair

Aquatic growth can accumulate rapidly on the transducer's surface reducing its performance in weeks. Clean the surface with a soft cloth and mild household detergent. If necessary, use a stiff brush or putty knife to remove the growth taking care to avoid making scratches. if fouling is severe , wet sand with #220 or finer grade wet/dry sandpaper.

Inspect the cable periodically for kinks, abrasions and cuts. Repair any damage using an approved waterproofing cable repair system. Inspect connections for indications of corrosion.

Tank Mount Installation Instructions

IMPORTANT: Please read the instructions completely before proceeding with the installation.
NOTE: Use these only as a guide. It is the responsibility of the end user to select the correct installation type for your vessel.
WARNING: NEVER USE SOVENTS! Certain cleaners, gasoline, paint, sealants and other products may contain strong solvents, such as acetone, which can attack many plastics dramatically reducing their strength. Clean surface of thransducer with a mild detergent only.

Mounting Location

The transducer must be fully immersed in water and not subjected to air bubbles,
or turbulent water flowing across the radiating face.

Acoustic Noise

Acoustic noise is always present and these sound waves can interfere with the operation of the transducer. While background noise cannot be controlled, carefully selecting the transducer mounting location can minimize the effect of vessel generated noise. The lower the noise level, the higher the echo-sounder gain setting that can be used.

Background noise sources:

  • Waves and air bubbles
  • Fish and mammals
  • Rain and hail
  • Other vessels and shore

Vessel generated noise sources:

  • Propeller(s)
  • Propeller shaft vibration
  • Aerated and turbulent water flowing across the hull
  • Machinery such as: engine, generator. gears and pumps
  • Interference from other echo-sounders

On Displacement Hulls:

Carefully study the shape of the hull to determine the best transducer mounting location where:

  • The transducer is away from the propeller and other sources of vessel generated noise.
  • The water is smoothest with a minimum of turbulence and bubbles.

1. Locate the transducer about 1/3 aft LWL. Generally, this provides the best compromise between obtaining aeration-free water away from the bow and minimizing propeller noise.

 

2. Water near the keel can be quite aerated. Mounting it away from the keel can minimize interference with the transducer. Also, the deeper the transducer protrudes into the water, the less aeration.

3. Mount the transducer on the side of the hull where the propeller is moving downward. The upward motion of the propeller generates pressure waves and pushes bubbles up against the hull. By mounting on the downward side, the hull shades the transducer from this effect.

Caution: Do not mount the sensor in an area of turbulence or bubbles:

  • Behind strakes, fittings or hull irregularities.
  • Near the keel
  • Behind eroding paint (an indication of turbulence)

Threaded Rod Placement Dimensions

Installation

Preparing the Installation Site

Using a Threaded Stem Stuffing Tube

1. Position the Airmar fairing at the selected location being sure that the blunt end points forward toward the bow. (The example housing is symmetrical.) The distance between the two threaded rod holes equals 305mm (12.0").

The stuffing tube is located about half way between the threaded rods. Inspect the hull interior to ensure that there is clearance for the stuffing tube and that no cables, ribs or struts will interfere. Mark the site for the threaded rods and stuffing tube.

Warning: Always wear safety googles and a dust mask.

2. From inside the hull, drill a 3mm (1/8") diameter pilot hole for the stuffing tube. However, if there is a hull irregularity near the selected mounting location, drill from the outside. If the pilot hole is drilled in the wrong location, drill a second hole in a better location. In a fiberglass hull apply masking tape on the outside of the hull over the incorrect hole and fill it with epoxy. For wooden hulls fill the incorrect hole with marine sealant; in metal weld the hole closed.

3. At the pilot hole, drill a 28mm (1-1/8") diameter hole from the outside perpendicular to the hull surface for the stuffing tube. Remove all burrs and clean the area around the hole, inside and outside, to ensure that the marine sealant will adhere properly. A backing block may be required under the flanged nut to ensure that it can be tightened against a flat surface.

4. Drill two l0mm (1 3/32") diameter holes through the hull and backing block for the threaded rods. Care must be taken to ensure that the two rods are parallel to the keel to reduce drag.

5. Install the stuffing tube first. Remove the nuts, washers and bushing from the stuffing tube. Select a marine grade sealant and follow the directions for its use. Apply a 3mm (1/8") thick layer of marine sealant to the stuffing tube from the flange that makes contact with the outside of the hull to where the flanged nut will be tightened inside the hull. This will seal the hull and hold the nut securely in place.

6. Push the stem of the stuffing tube through the hull and fasten the flanged nut inside. On a fiberglass or metal hull, tighten this nut securely. On an aluminum hull use the spacers to isolate the stuffing tube from the hull, being sure to apply marine sealant to the spacers as well. If the hull is wood and has been out of the water for a prolonged period, it is suggested that the flanged nut be hand tightened only. Wood will swell after the boat is in the water and exert considerable pressure on the stuffing tube hardware. After the hull has expanded, tighten the nut securely.

7. Route the cable to the echo-sounder being careful not to tear the cable jacket when passing it through the bulkhead and other parts of the boat. To reduce electrical interference separate the transducer cable from other electrical wiring and the engine. Coil any excess cable and secure it in place with zip-ties to prevent damage.

8.Wire the transducer to the Echosounder per diagram: Bathy-500MF or Bathy-1500

Tank Mount

Some transducers can be tank mounted. If this is your style transducer, it is recommended that the clamp bar be shortened and re-drilled to accommodate two bolts. They will secure the transducer to threaded stand-offs that are welded to the floor of the tank.

In Resin Housing

1. Apply marine sealant to one end of each threaded rod. Secure each rod with a nut. The rods should extend a minimum of 3 threads beyond the nut. Slide a stainless steel washer and rubber washer onto each rod (see Figure 6).

2. Insert the transducer into the housing and place the clamp bar on top. Slide the threaded rods up through the housing and clamp bar. Secure the assembly in place with a stainless steel washer and nut. Tighten the nuts with a torque wrench using a force not exceeding 4 N-m (3 ft-lb).

3. Slide the fairing onto the threaded rods and against the surface of the transducer assembly. Following the manufacturers directions apply a 3mm (1/8") thick layer of marine sealant to the surface of the fairing that will make contact with the hull and the two threaded rods that will pass through the hull.

Caution: Never pull, carry or hold the transducer by its cable as this may sever internal connections.

4. Thread the transducer cable through the stuffing tube to the inside of the hull. Allow a service loop in the cavity of the fairing so there is no tension applied to the cable.

5. Place the entire assembly against the hull, pushing the rods through the hull. With a person stationed inside the vessel apply marine sealant to the two threaded rods where the backing block and nut will seat. Position the backing blocks on the rods and secure them with a stainless steel washer and nut. Tighten the nuts with a torque wrench using a force not exceeding 7 N-m (5 ft-lb). Remove excess sealant from the hull.

Note: If a wood fairing is used, hand tighten the nuts only. Allow the fairing to swell and then tighten to 4N-m (3ft-lb).

6. Plug the mounting holes to minimize turbulence on the surface of the transducer using the white, foam, plug material. Cut the foam to length so that, when installed, each plug is recessed 5mm (3/16") below the surface of the housing. Push these foam plugs into the holes and use marine sealant to fill the holes even with the transducer's surface. Remove excess sealant to ensure smooth water flow over the transducer.

7. Seal the cable by sliding the washer, rubber compression bushing, washer, and the compression nut along the transducer cable to the stuffing tube. Make sure the rubber bushing fits securely into the machined lip of the tube. Tighten the compression nut. Remove all excess sealant inside the hull.

8. Route the cable to the echo-sounder being careful not to tear the cable jacket when passing it through the bulkhead and other parts of the boat. To reduce electrical interference, keep the transducer cable separated from other electrical wiring and the engine. Coil any excess cable and secure it in place with zip-ties to prevent damage.

Tank Mount

Resin Housing

 Check for Leaks:

Warning: Never install a transducer and leave the boat in the water unchecked for several days.

When the boat is placed in the water, immediately check around the bolts that fasten the transducer to the hull and the stuffing tube for leaks. Note that very small leaks may not be readily observed. It is best not to leave the boat in the water unattended for more than 3 hours before checking it again. If there is a small leak, there may be considerable bilge water accumulation after 24 hours (probably not enough to cause water damage). If a leak is observed, repeat the bedding and installation procedures immediately.

Antifouling Paint:

Surfaces exposed to salt water must be coated with antifouling paint.

Use water-based antifouling paint only. Never use ketone-based paints as it can attack many plastics damaging the transducer. Apply antifouling paint every six months, or at the beginning of each boating season.

Maintenance and Repair

Aquatic growth can accumulate rapidly on the transducer's surface reducing its performance in weeks. Clean the surface with a soft cloth and mild household detergent. If necessary, use a stiff brush or putty knife to remove the growth taking care to avoid making scratches. if fouling is severe , wet sand with #220 or finer grade wet/dry sandpaper.

Inspect the cable periodically for kinks, abrasions and cuts. Repair any damage using an approved waterproofing cable repair system. Inspect connections for indications of corrosion.